Tag Archives | goodreads

Reading update: Spring into Contemporary YA

ya-fiction-contemporaryNearly halfway through the year – how’s your reading going?
Here’s my reading so far:

2017 Reading Challenge

2017 Reading Challenge
Rhian has
read 26 books toward
her goal of
50 books.
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UPDATE – ugh, there’s supposed to be a fancy grid of book covers here but I can’t get the coding to work. Apparently Goodreads doesn’t play nicely with WordPress. 🙁

So, instead I need you to imagine a pretty grid of book covers here, and head over to my Goodreads if you’d like to check the titles out. Visualise some graphic novels (one with a cute-but-sad robot on it), a couple of Fancy Literature covers (looking all serious), and a glut of YA Contemporary.

Yup, you read that right: Contemporary. I read a few books in a row that had NO magic in them: and I liked it! (They would have been even better with magic in, though. Just sayin’…)

My favourite? It’s hard to choose – The Sun is Also A Star was gorgeous, but the Holly Bourne books & Beautiful Broken Things were more relatable because they mirrored my own teen experiences with food, friendships & feminism. They are funny, & sensitive, & I wish I could have read them when I was still in school. Also, Holly’s Spinster Club idea is AWESOME, so, with stiff competion, Am I Normal Yet wins. Go forth & read it!

Right now I’m reading Lady Midnight (back to the magic & demons for me!). Not my favourite Cassie Clare so far, partly because I don’t need all the Shadowhunter background info-dumps, having read them all loads of times, but the more I read the more interesting it becomes.

Emma reminds me of a female Jace, and I love poor, tortured Mark. Will there be anyone I love as much as Tess, Clary, Will or Simon, though? Maybe not – but here’s hoping.

Which read has lit you up this year? Let me know & I’ll add it to my TBR list!

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My Top Fantasy/Young Adult Reads of 2016

I read 50 books in 2016, which is record breaking for me. Here’s a selection of my faves. Add me on Goodreads so I can see what you read!

(NB: these are in no order, and they are books read in 2016, not published).

nimona graphic novel cover1. This graphic novel was a cracking start to the year – Nimona, by Noelle Stevenson. Hilarious, swashbuckling & perfectly drawn, I’ve since repeatedly bought this for friends as it’s the silly kind of funny my inner circle all love.

2. Uprooted by Naomi Novik. I was on the British Fantasy Awards jury for Best Novel this year, which meant I had to read a clutch of wonderful books, fast.

Honorable mention to Joe Abercrombie’s Shattered Sea series, which I happily crammed into a week so I could read the shortlisted final instalment, but Uprooted was my favourite of the nominees. I liked how it subverted some of the expectations of the genre, and never went quite where I expected it to.

3. Fire and Hemlock by Dianna Wynne Jones. Now, this one definitely didn’t come out in 2016. I’ve been meaning to read it for pretty much as long as I’ve been reading. I read her now-classic Archers Goon when I was about ten, & I was awed because I didn’t know books were ‘allowed’ to be so funny and weird.

This is the Wynne-Jones novel Maggie Stiefvater always recommends, so it’s no surprise that I liked it. ‘Magic happening to ordinary children’ is always a fave setup (see also: E Nesbit), and Polly was the kind of girl I’d have liked to be friends with. I was wrong-footed by the ending, but I got to go online and find plenty of theories and rants about it, always a bonus.

4. Joan Aiken was another writer I loved way back when. Black Hearts in Battersea (the sequel to The Wolves of Willoughby Chase) gave me a hilarious, easy read on last year’s miserable winter commutes. Cool points for being set in the parts of London I commuted to!

power naomi alderman5. The Power by Naomi Alderman Ahhh this was an EPIC read. I found it while prowling Audible with a spare credit burning a hole in my account. This had a blurb from Margaret Atwood (MARGARET ATWOOD!), so hello, instabuy!

The novel is set in a version of our society where women develop a unique physical power, making them more physically powerful than men. It plays with several ideas of power, how we use and react to it, and how power shapes cultures and history.

I didn’t stop listening for days, pausing only to recommend it to all of my friends and rave about it on Twitter. I even listened while cooking at Christmas, hoping no one would come in & recoil from the violent parts. (The gravity of audiobooks is such that people will always come in during the violent or romantic parts).

6. Of course I need to include The Raven King here, because Continue Reading →

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